psnnation
aroihkin:

accobi:

beranyth:

prothy-the-prothean:

masterassassino:

doctorscottie:

ozolopolis:

xeruth:

pepsie:

theamericankid:

Gaming Logic

more you tilt your body your character will get away from danger

the louder you yell, the more critical hits you’ll land

when you stand up you can see everyone’s weakspots

when you tilt your head you’ll be able to see more of the area

When you lean forward, you get +30% concentration.

When you use controller 1, it means you’ll win

Throwing yourself bodily to the side helps you avoid obstacles in racing.

Threatening the playable character with physical injury will make platform puzzles easier.

All of these things. All of them.

aroihkin:

accobi:

beranyth:

prothy-the-prothean:

masterassassino:

doctorscottie:

ozolopolis:

xeruth:

pepsie:

theamericankid:

Gaming Logic

more you tilt your body your character will get away from danger

the louder you yell, the more critical hits you’ll land

when you stand up you can see everyone’s weakspots

when you tilt your head you’ll be able to see more of the area

When you lean forward, you get +30% concentration.

When you use controller 1, it means you’ll win

Throwing yourself bodily to the side helps you avoid obstacles in racing.

Threatening the playable character with physical injury will make platform puzzles easier.

All of these things. All of them.

theatlantic
theatlantic:

The Elegance of Beowulf in 100 Tweets

From years of use, people know this: Twitter can be a lot of noise. 
But sometimes, to get a tweet just right, to make it fit, I stop and consider the language. In this digital format, we are forced to distill and compress, two poetic virtues that the web rarely requires. 
But what if you’re not trying to describe an airport or a sunset, but Beowulf, the (gory, dark) epic Old English poem? 
That was the task that Stanford medievalist (and “text technologies”) researcher Elaine Treharne took on. She compressed Beowulf into 100 tweets as part of teaching her course on the many “existing and imagined manifestations” of the work. 
“The underlying theoretical question for this course is ‘What is (the) Text?’ What constitutes Beowulf? What is its core and what do we understand by ‘Beowulf’?” she wrote in her explanation of the project. “In some senses, this seeks to address, for Beowulf, F. W. Bateson’s question, ‘If the Mona Lisa is in the Louvre, where then are Hamlet and Lycidas?’”
Read more.

theatlantic:

The Elegance of Beowulf in 100 Tweets

From years of use, people know this: Twitter can be a lot of noise. 

But sometimes, to get a tweet just right, to make it fit, I stop and consider the language. In this digital format, we are forced to distill and compress, two poetic virtues that the web rarely requires. 

But what if you’re not trying to describe an airport or a sunset, but Beowulf, the (gory, dark) epic Old English poem? 

That was the task that Stanford medievalist (and “text technologies”) researcher Elaine Treharne took on. She compressed Beowulf into 100 tweets as part of teaching her course on the many “existing and imagined manifestations” of the work. 

The underlying theoretical question for this course is ‘What is (the) Text?’ What constitutes Beowulf? What is its core and what do we understand by ‘Beowulf’?” she wrote in her explanation of the project. “In some senses, this seeks to address, for Beowulf, F. W. Bateson’s question, ‘If the Mona Lisa is in the Louvre, where then are Hamlet and Lycidas?’”

Read more.